The Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada, together with numerous collaborators, has produced an action plan entitled “Impact of noise on the Beluga Whale at risk in the St. Lawrence Estuary”. This plan aims to provide tools for the recovery of the St. Lawrence beluga as well as other at-risk or endangered species such as the blue whale, fin whale and North Atlantic right whale. As its name suggests, the plan specifically targets actions to reduce the impacts associated with noise generated by human activities. Prior to adoption, the public is invited to submit comments on the actions being proposed.

You can therefore participate in the consultation process through September 22.

You can email your comments to the following address: SARA/[email protected]. Or you can send them by mail to:

Director
Species at Risk Program
Fisheries and Oceans Canada
200 Kent St.
Ottawa, ON K1A 0E6

To view the action plan, click on this link: https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/species-risk-public-registry/action-plans/beluga-whale-st-lawrence-estuary-2019-proposed.html

News - 13/8/2019

Marie-Ève Muller

Marie-Ève Muller is responsible for GREMM's communications and spokeperson for the Quebec Marine Mammal Emergencies Response Network (QMMERN). As Editor-in-Chief for Whales Online, she devours research and has an insatiable thirst for the stories of scientists and observers. Drawing from her background in literature and journalism, Marie-Ève strives to put the fragile reality of cetaceans into words and images.

Recommended articles

New Whale Species Discovered

Field observations are not the only way to discover new animal species. Through lab analyses of preserved skeletons and samples,…

|News 29/11/2021

“Window on Belugas” project receives $600,000 in funding from the Quebec government

On Monday, November 15, 2021 at 2:30 p.m., a press conference was held in Cacouna to announce the Government of Quebec’s…

|News 12/11/2021

North Atlantic Right Whales: Climate Refugees

The North Atlantic right whale population is down to approximately 350 individuals and is critically endangered. The recovery of this…

|News 8/11/2021