When the United Nations launches a theme, it’s not merely symbolic. From 2021 to 2030, the theme will be the “United Nations Decade of Ocean Sciences for Sustainable Development”. In a context where experts are concerned by the health of our oceans and where humanity needs all the carbon sinks it can get to fight climate change, the UN wishes to catalyze the efforts of the scientific community, governments and civil society organizations around the globe to improve the plight of our oceans.

The international body realized that our knowledge of oceans was lacking, compromising the chances of properly protecting these ecosystems essential to the health of our planet. This is why colossal efforts will be made to unravel the secrets of the world’s five oceans. The knowledge acquired will aim to take better care of ocean ecosystems and use them in accordance with the principles of sustainable development.

By 2030, new regional and international policies should be adopted and, hopefully, numerous mysteries revealed.

And your role in all of this? Whether you’re a member of an organization or just a curious citizen, everyone can contribute to the Decade of the Oceans! Numerous scientific and awareness-raising activities will be organized in the months to come. A first event will take place in Quebec in June, namely Ocean Week. Mark your calendars!

News - 6/4/2021

Marie-Ève Muller

Marie-Ève Muller is responsible for GREMM's communications and spokeperson for the Quebec Marine Mammal Emergencies Response Network (QMMERN). As Editor-in-Chief for Whales Online, she devours research and has an insatiable thirst for the stories of scientists and observers. Drawing from her background in literature and journalism, Marie-Ève strives to put the fragile reality of cetaceans into words and images.

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