On the morning of August 13, as the tide was rising, we identify a group of fin whales in the distance. A “forest” of huge spouts…

We slowly approach them. It’s a tight group of six highly dynamic fin whales. Leading the way is Trou, a well known fin whale in the area. They disappear on a nine-minute dive. The boat stays put. Suddenly they surface again, just a few metres from our craft. I shoot a short video that portrays the beauty of these blasts and the power of these marine mammals. For higher resolution, click on the small gear in the bottom right hand corner of the video to adjust the quality to HD 720.

Here are a few photos of this beautiful moment off of Tadoussac:

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4417_112829709745_3688559_n_modifié-1-e1432474398285GREMM research assistant from 2003 to 2009 and from 2012 to 2014, Renaud Pintiaux is a passionate observer and photographer. Year round, whether from shore or on the water, he takes every opportunity to observe marine mammals and birds in the Saguenay–St. Lawrence Marine Park.

Field Notes - 18/8/2016

Renaud Pintiaux

GREMM research assistant from 2003 to 2009 and from 2012 to 2014, Renaud Pintiaux is a passionate observer and photographer. Year round, whether from shore or on the water, he takes every opportunity to observe marine mammals and birds in the Saguenay–St. Lawrence Marine Park.

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