H887

Humpback Whale

ligne décoration
  • ID number

    H887

  • Sex

    Unknown

  • Year of birth

    Unknown

  • Known Since

    2018

Distinctive traits

A mostly white tail with three black lines on the left lobe.

 

Life history

In 2017, the Mingan Island Cetacean Study (MICS) photographs a new humpback whale off the Gaspé Peninsula: H887. The following year, GREMM’s team photographs this beautiful, elegant humpback in the Estuary. It then lingers in the area for at least four weeks in August and September. In July 2019, H887 impresses observers with its aerial prowess and surprising behaviours. It was seen rolling on the surface and slapping its pectoral and caudal fins. In 2020, H887 is present once again in the St. Lawrence. For the moment, we know very little about its life or its migrations. To be continued!

Photo: Renaud Pintiaux

Observations history in the Estuary

2018
2019
2020

Years in which the animal was not observed Years in which the animal was observed

Latest news from the publications Portrait de baleines

Among the twenty or so humpback whales currently present in the Estuary, you may have noticed this one. Breaching, swimming on its back, turning over itself, slapping its tail or pectoral fins, H887 is particularly active on the surface. “She’s really special and exuberant. Together with Tic Tac Toe’s calf, she’s the one with the most tricks up her sleeve when we’re observing her,” points out photographer Renaud Pintiaux. Already last year, this same whale had impressed observers with its aerial acrobatics to the point of being nicknamed “queen of antics” by GREMM’s research assistants.

Unfortunately, very little is known about this humpback, not even its age or gender. With its predominantly white tail, H887 can easily be confused with H858, a.k.a. “Queen”, but there is one minor difference in the current photos: H887 features two large gold patches on its tail; these are small parasitic algae called diatoms, which can remain attached for several weeks or even months. First spotted in 2017 off the Gaspé Peninsula, H887 was later the first humpback identified in the St. Lawrence in May 2018 and the last one to leave in October 2019. It therefore seems to enjoy spending time in these prime feeding grounds and on its way to becoming a faithful visitor to the Marine Park.

In 2017, the Mingan Island Cetacean Study (MICS) photographs a new humpback whale off the Gaspé Peninsula: H887. The following year, the GREMM team photographs this beautiful, elegant humpback in the Estuary. It then lingers in the area for at least four weeks in August and September. This year, since early July, H887 has been impressing observers with its aerial prowess and surprising behaviours. It was seen rolling on the surface, slapping its pectoral or caudal fins. Will H887 become a regular visitor to the Estuary or one of its stars?